Tag Archives: telephone scam

What If I Don’t Have Caller ID?

I’m guilty of assuming everyone has caller ID these days. While the feature may be baked right into mobile phones, caller ID service for landline phones is still a feature you usually have to pay extra for. And some people don’t want to.

So how should these holdouts handle telephone scams?

My advice is: get on the list and be quick on the draw. First, add your number to the National Do-Not-Call Registry. Once it takes effect, it will weed out all the legitimate, non-scam phone calls. Anyone who calls with an offer or sales pitch after that is obviously ignoring federal regulations and can be assumed to be attempting to commit fraud. If you’ve answered the phone, hang up as soon as you realize what’s happening.

Second, the vast majority of scammers use automated robocalls, where they ring multiple phones at once and then connect with whomever answers first. That setup takes a moment to function, and causes recognizable audio artifacts. If you’ve answered the phone and don’t get a response within a second or so, you can assume it is a robocall and hang up. If you answer and the first thing you hear is electronic noises (little clicks, bloops, beeps, etc.) or silence, it’s safe to assume you’re dealing with a robocall and hang up.

If you’ve hung up on a legitimate caller, they’ll call back.

Failing the quick-draw hang-up technique, if you find yourself talking to an unexpected caller, the old rules still apply: if they’re trying to make you afraid, it’s probably a scam; if the offer sounds too good to be true, it’s probably a scam; never wire money to a stranger; the IRS doesn’t call to demand payment over the phone; you didn’t win the lottery; your grandchild isn’t in jail or a hospital overseas; your computer doesn’t have a virus; never press “1” for any reason.

You’re under no obligation to be polite to someone who is trying to trick you out of your money over the phone. You’re allowed to just hang up without explanation.

The IRS Is Using Private Debt Collectors Who Will Make Calls, but This Actually Changes Nothing

Sometimes fraud prevention can be boiled down to nice, simple rules that don’t leave much room for subtlety. Never wire money to a stranger. Just keeping that one rule in mind will keep you out of a lot of trouble, even if you forget the details of the scams that utilize the technique.

The IRS will never call you was another one of those hard rules, but as of 2017, it’s become a little more complicated. However, for the most part, nothing has really changed when it comes to fraud prevention.

Basically, the IRS will be contracting with four collection agencies, who will only be contacting certain taxpayers who have been delinquent for a significant period of time, whom the IRS has been unable to locate, and who meet certain other criteria. Furthermore, the collectors will not be demanding payments. Instead, they will be directing taxpayers toward electronic options for paying the IRS directly.

This means that some people will be getting calls from collection agencies on behalf of the IRS. The rest of the fraud prevention rules still apply: if they threaten you with incarceration or demand immediate payment, it’s a scam. If they’re talking about wiring money or loading up gift cards, it’s a scam.

Since con artists are nothing if not adaptable, I’ll add this point: if they do anything other than tell you about how you can pay the IRS directly on your own, it’s a scam. I’m sure someone is already gearing up to make calls claiming to be a collection agency, then telling victims they can pay over the phone with a credit card, with a wire transfer or with prepaid gift cards, or by visiting a fraudulent website. The collection agencies the IRS is using will not be asking for nor accepting payments from delinquent taxpayers. At all.

The actual website where you can pay your taxes, overdue or otherwise, is IRS.gov/Pay. And that’s pretty much the only thing the collection agencies contracted by the IRS are going to be allowed to tell you. Any mention of a different website to pay your taxes? Scam.

I recommend reading the full article below for more detailed information.