Tag Archives: SSN

Child Identity Theft: How shady credit repair companies are stealing kids’ Social Security Numbers

Shady, fly-by-night credit repair companies that promise fast credit score improvements (700-800 in just a couple months!) may be sinking to a new low here. It seems they’re harvesting valid but inactive Social Security numbers, many from children too young to have opened financial accounts.

They sell the numbers as “CPNs,” or “Credit Profile Numbers” (sometimes the “P” is “privacy” or “protection”). They tell their customers how to piggyback their credit on the clean CPN, which has the effect of making them appear more creditworthy. Once they burn through the credit for that number, they just purchase another one (I wonder if they use a credit card).

There are several articles on the topic all over the Internet. The Sun News out of South Carolina has a good one that explains it very well. However, there are still a few questions I have about this crime:

  1. Am I to understand that simply calling it a “CPN” instead of a Social Security Number somehow makes this practice legal?
  2. How are they obtaining the SSNs of all these children? Are they using a logarithim to generate the numbers, or is your Social publicly available until you turn 18?
  3. If it is, do I have to personally go to Washington D.C. and rap my knuckles on every single noggin in Congress (and yell “Helloooo, McFly, anybody home?!” in every single ear) until this is remedied with Federal intervention?

In any case, it’s time to check your kids’ credit reports. Yes, today. You don’t want to wait until they get turned down for an auto loan fifteen years later for allegedly defaulting on $45,000 worth of credit card debt.

This has been a pretty big story in the fraud prevention world. Look for more information to surface over the next few weeks.

When do you have to give your Social Security Number?

You hear a lot of information about when not to give out your Social Security number, but when are you required to reveal it?

The short (and incomplete) answer is: any time you’re doing something that involves taxable income.

A little more specifically, you’re probably going to be required to provide your SSN in the following situations:

  • Opening a new account at a financial institution
  • Taxes
  • When you get a new job
  • When obtaining or renewing your driver’s license or other state-issued identification
  • Conducting business involving government welfare or healthcare (Medicare, for example)

Aside from those situations, be very cautious about sharing your number. Actually, be very cautious anyway, but in other situations you would be wise to ask:

  • Why your number is needed
  • How your number will be used
  • What happens if you refuse
  • What law requires you to give your number

Finally, be extremely cautious (read: don’t do it at all) when it comes to people asking for your Social over the telephone or Internet, especially if they initiated the contact with you. If you can’t verify who the requesting entity is (as well as the answers to the four questions above), refuse to share your number.