Tag Archives: Scams

Department of Veterans Affairs warns of scam targeting veterans

Well, this is just gross.

According to a warning released by the VA, scam artists have been targeting veterans over the telephone. They claim to be VA workers, telling victims that the VA has new procedures regarding prescriptions, and that they need the veterans’ credit card information.

Of course, the VA will never call veterals asking for credit card numbers or any other personal information.

It just illustrates the Number One Rule of Fraud Prevention:

Never give any personal information to an unsolicited caller, no matter who they claim to be.

If you have friends, family or neighbors who are veterans (especially elderly veterans), make sure they know about this scam, and that they know not to give out personal information.

The source for this post is “Scam targets veterans’ credit card info, VA warns,” published at CNN.com on 9/18/09.

Watch Out For Census Scams

What do economic stimulus packages, Cash For Clunkers, tax refunds, and the U.S. Census all have in common?

Besides the obvious fact that they’re all related to da gubbermint, they’re also things that people have turned (or could turn) into scams.

The 2010 Census is already in its early stages, and workers are already going door-to-door to verify addresses. However, you know as well as I do that there are also going to be some con artists out there, trying to get personal information for fraudulent use.

Ask any Census worker to show you his or her identification and badge before you answer questions. They will not ask for your Social Security number, credit card or bank account information, or donations. Anyone attempting to get this information from you is attempting to commit fraud. Politely refuse to answer their questions, close and lock your door, then contact police immediately. A Census worker will also never ask to enter your home.

Also, Census workers will only contact you by telephone, in person or by U.S. Mail (meaning envelopes-with-paper-in-them). They will not use email in any circumstance. Immediately delete any emails that claim to be from the U.S. Census.

Why don’t they use email, and why will they never do so?

Well, it’s because of people like me. I have six email addresses that I can think of offhand. There are probably another five or six that I don’t even remember. One of them is just so I can use Google Reader, and another is a leftover from an old blog, but my work email and two out of my three home emails are pretty active. Within a single household, there might be twenty email addresses, including young children. Can you imagine the mess that would ensue if they tried to use email to conduct a Census? There would be panic on a heretofore unseen level when the results came out that the population had rocketed up to 2 billion people over the last ten years.

The core information in this post was taken from “Be cautious about giving info to census workers.

Worst. Scam. Attempt. Ever.

Here’s an attempt at an email scam that nobody should ever fall for. Seriously, it’s like they weren’t even trying:

From: “Mr. R. Jan” <[removed]@gmail.com>
Sent 9/6/2009 3:21:48 PM
To: [removed]
Subject: ATTENTION NEEDED

My name is Mr. Jan and I am contacting you from Liberia for
a mutual business relationship and investment.
I have some funds realized through contract brokerage and I
need your cooperation to invest the funds.
The first stage requires transferring the funds to your
account for subsequent investment.
I therefore want you to work with me as a partner.  On
receipt of your response, I will send you full details of
the transaction and more information about myself.  I
am waiting for your prompt response.
Jan

I’m not even going to bother picking this thing apart. Yes, it’s a total scam. Yes, you should just delete it. No, it’s not a real investment opportunity.

Online Scams Vol. 3: Work at home scams are everywhere

Crooks these days. They’re nothing if not adaptable.

Have you seen the number of work-at-home “jobs” being offered on the Internet these days? They know what’s up. A lot of people are losing their jobs and are looking for something new. And it’s a great American tradition—recession (or depression) takes your job, start your own business!

However, the fact is that most people don’t have the right kind of entrepreneurial “spark” needed to start a successful business venture. It takes a certain kind of grit, a deep belief in yourself and your “product,” the ability to hold your head high when faced with failure (and to learn from that failure and move on, instead of taking it personally and wallowing in it), and the kind of positive attitude that, frankly, tends to get obliterated when you’re worrying about how you’re going to pay the mortgage next week.

Let’s face it: starting your own business is way, way tougher than working for someone else. How many times have you seen someone start their own little store because they were “tired of working 40 hours a week,” and you check out their new digs and they’ve got no clear vision for their business, they’re trying to be everything to everyone, and they’re only open five or six hours per day because they’re trying to make owning a business easier than working for someone else? How long did they last?

And I think most of us, deep down, know that. “I’d love to work for myself, but yeesh! 18 hour days, seven days a week?” It’s okay to admit that you’re not a natural born entrepreneur (can you become one? Of course. You can become anything you intend). But most of us know—it is a path of great resistance.

Send in the Work-at-Home-Scam Clowns.

They sound great, don’t they? Stay at home, do some menial task that takes ten minutes, and let “the power of the Internet” (or something) do the rest. You’ll have so many Porsches by this time next year, you won’t know what to do with them all!

Of course I’m going to tell you they’re all completely full of baloney. Nobody is going to pay you hundreds of thousands of dollars per year for nothing.

“Oh, but they’re not paying you,” you’ll say. “You’re starting your own business!”

Well, at best you’re going to pay them a large amount of money for a “startup kit,” fees, or other such bull. You’re not going to assemble kits at home, you’re not going to enter any data, and you’re not going to get paid to stuff envelopes. You’re going to get ripped off.

Fraud.org (run by the National Consumers League) has a great article called “Tips for Avoiding Work-at-Home Scams.” I would recommend you take a few minutes to read the entire article, but the following is a summary of their tips:

  • Know who you’re dealing with
  • Don’t believe that you can make big profits easily
  • Be cautious about emails offering work-at-home opportunities (real companies do not recruit in this way. Ever)
  • Get all the details before you pay
  • Find out if there is really a market for your work
  • Get references for other people who are doing the work
  • Be aware of legal requirements (medical billing requires a license, for example)
  • Know the refund policy
  • Be wary of offers to send you an “advance” on your “pay”
  • Do your own research about work-at-home opportunities

I would amend that fourth tip slightly: just don’t ever pay someone else to work for them.

About.com also has a nice article on this topic: “Work at Home Scams.” I’d suggest you read this as well.

Finally, never, ever trust the phrase, “Other work at home sites are scams, but I found one that isn’t!” There are tons of fake blogs out there. I even found one by searching for “work at home scams.” It had a whole article, possibly culled from a trusted news source, about avoiding these traps. It claimed to be an article from a newspaper in Cleveland. As you read, you suddenly find you’ve been eased into a sales pitch about how “this one isn’t a scam!”

Do they need to make it any more obvious?

Hit these links

Let’s take a break from the Identity Theft Myths series today, and instead look at some other topics from other places on the web.

“Is Facebook becoming Phishingbook?” explores a social media scam that seems to be growing lately. Summary: if you’re Facebook friend tells you they’ve been mugged in London and need you to wire money, don’t.

Excellent advice from Craigslist. There is a lot of fraud happening through this popular site. Summary: only buy/sell locally, and never wire money. Ever.

“10 Ways to Avoid Sneaky Work-at-home Scams” is exactly what it sounds like. Summary: the economy is weak and these scams are only going to become more common.

“Beware of Cash For Clunkers Scams.” I’ve covered this here before, but the Eastern Michigan BBB has some more information on the topic. Summary: CARS works by taking your heap, junker or jalopy (or “hoopty,” in the parlance of our times) to a dealer and trading it. There is no pre-registration or anything.

We’ll return to the Identity Theft Myths next Monday. Until then, have fun.

Scamming the scammers: a really, really bad idea

One of the cool things about running this site is that I get to see the search terms people have used to find their way here. “WA Surveys” has been a surprisingly common search that has led visitors to the FPU, and “mystery shopper scam” has brought in some traffic. I hope I’ve provided some value to those folks.

However, you also get some weird ones.

The other day, the search term that led someone to the Fraud Prevention Unit was “i want to scam the mystery shopper scam.”

This was a little disturbing to me.

I know what some people are thinking; “Well, they’re crooks, so it’s alright to try to rip them off, right?” And I can understand the impulse—vigilante justice, give them a taste of their own medicine, free money in a down economy, etc.

But it’s a really bad idea to even try. For one thing, the crooks perpetrating the scam aren’t going to feel your wrath at all. They just printed up a bunch of fake checks and sent them out to thousands of people. They’re usually not linked to any real accounts at all, and they’re certainly not linked to accounts owned by the criminals themselves.

But wait, there’s more!

At the point you knowingly present a fraudulent instrument (such as a cashier’s check) to a bank or credit union, you are committing fraud on a financial institution. That is a federal offense, and it carries a prison term if you’re found guilty.

This is serious, serious business.

Besides, a lot of these scams are run by organized crime operations. At some level, there are probably some violent people involved. These are not people you want to go messing around with.

Okay, there’s not a huge chance they’ll find out about your little attempted counter-scheme, but why risk it? You’re already not going to get to keep the money, and you might end up in a federal prison. Do you really need goons coming after you, on top of everything else?

By the way, you didn’t win the lottery

Here’s a good rule of thumb when deciding how to respond to a potentially fraudulent email message, letter, telephone call or other type of communication: if a stranger walked up to you on the street and said the exact same thing, would you believe them?

For example, you’re walking down the street when a random guy in a shabby gray suit approaches you. He says, “Greetings, I am a foreign dignitary currently in exile and would like to ask for your assistance in transferring my fortune into the United States, totaling 250 million USD. If you help, I will let you keep 25% of that amount. I will need your checking account number to complete this process.”

You’d tell the clown to get lost.

Or perhaps he says, “Congratulations! You have been selected in the Canadian lottery as the top prizewinner! In order to claim your prize of 2.5 million USD, please give me a cashier’s check for $2,945.23 to cover taxes and other fees.”

Unless you’re very gullible, your reaction would be the same.

I know that the economy isn’t good at the moment. You might be facing layoffs, reduction in pay, or worse. Your employer might be going out of business completely. You get an email that promises instant riches and it seems like all your prayers have been answered.

These thieves know that. That’s why they’re in the fraud business to begin with. They’re counting on your sleepless nights of worrying about where you’re going to get the money to make it. And they’re only going to make your situation worse.

You have to keep your guard up. Imagine that offer coming from a stranger on the street, and you will instantly see through it.

Mystery Shopper Scam Variations

Lately I’ve been getting a ton of emails with offers for…you guessed it: mystery shopper jobs.

Naturally, I know these are a scam, but I did open one of them (afterrunning a quick virus scan on it, just to be sure!). They are from a company called WA Surveys, allegedly based in Seattle. Run a Google search on that phrase and you’ll get all kinds of results confirming that it is indeed a scam. Better yet, Google “WA Surveys” and the word “scam.” This company has quite a colorful history.

I couldn’t help but notice the “from” line in these email messages, though; they were all apparently coming from…me. My email address was in both the “from” and “to” fields.

Odd, you might think, and you’d be correct. It’s also an excellent clue that you shouldn’t trust anything about that message. If they’re already trying to spoof the sending address, you know they’re up to something.

Of course, sometimes you’ll get messages  that appear to be from people who are in your address book. I’ve had a couple of these same messages appear to be coming from other people right here at REGIONAL. I don’t know how the senders are able to do this (is it a hack, or are they just skimming email addresses from the Internet?), but it should still raise red flags—why would your supervisor be sending you a message about mystery shopper jobs?

If you’re truly unsure, contact the person directly and ask them. However, the text of the message should give you all the clues you need. In this case, it said “mystery shopper,” promised a lot of money, asked for personal information outright, and came from WA Surveys, signed by a Michael McDowell or Michael Friedman (both are aliases used by the same person).

Then again, if it turns out your supervisor actually is suggesting a new line of work for you, it might be time to start looking for a new job on your own. Just don’t fall for one of these bogus offers.

Stay Vigilant

Nobody is ever 100% safe from fraud, scams or identity theft. Even if you’ve done everything possible to prevent becoming a victim, it can still happen.

Take, for example, the data breach at Heartland Payment Systems a few months ago. Through no fault of their own, thousands of people experienced unauthorized use of their credit or debit cards. It wasn’t that they fell for a phishing email or a fake phone call. They simply made a purchase or two at a store or restaurant that used Heartland as their card processor.

However, there is no reason to panic. By taking simple steps to stay safe on your end, you can drastically reduce your chances of becoming a victim of fraud.

The key is to be informed and vigilant. Know what the threats are, know how to spot a scam and keep a close watch on your financial statements, and you’ll be miles ahead of where the crooks would like you to be.

That’s why REGIONAL Federal Credit Union is bringing you this new website. We believe that education is key to achieving financial security and independence.

It’s not all doom and gloom, though. In fact, it is my aim to make this site as entertaining as possible (despite the admittedly bone-dry seriousness of this first post). I’ll be posting some Video Dispatches from the FPU very soon. Be sure to check those out. There’ll be enough weird props, strange pop culture references, silly music and bad acting for everyone, and you’ll learn something, too.

I’ll be learning, too. After all, there are new variations on these scams popping up all the time. It will be a chore to keep up, but I will do my best. In the meantime, questions, comments and suggestions are always welcome! Use the comment function below, or email me directly at cturpen@regionalfcu.org. Also be sure to follow the FPU on Twitter (@fraudprevunit). I’ll be posting tips and updates there as well.

And always remember: stay vigilant.