Make 2013 the year you take action against scams that target seniors

January 25, 2013

I know, you already made your New Year resolutions several weeks ago.

But I also know that you’re probably already using the treadmill as a clothes rack again, too, so it’s time to make some more.

This year, I am challenging you to take action against scams and identity theft that target older people.

Every year, seniors lose millions to scams that target them because crooks make certain assumptions:

  1. They’re wealthy
  2. They’re gullible
  3. They live alone
  4. They won’t tell anyone

And all too often, seniors who are victims of scams don’t tell their families, out of fear or shame. Too often, they do live without regular contact from their loved ones. That’s why it’s important to join in the fight against fraud.

Maybe it’s your parents or grandparents, aunts or uncles. Maybe it’s just a neighbor. Whoever you know, whoever you care about, talk to them. Tell them about the scams that target seniors—utility scams, the grandchild-in-jeopardy scam, the 419 scams, the phony investments (Iraqi Dinars), the fake sweepstakes calls, the work-at-home cons. You can find out more about these on this very site, and all over the Internet.

Visit more often this year. Have dinner together. Talk to them about life in general. Did they mention phone calls or letters that sound suspicious? You don’t have to pry or cajole—you don’t need to know every detail of their bank account, or try to convince them to add you as an authorized signer in most cases. But you need to talk more, be together more.

It’s important for other reasons, too, you know.

Can we all do that this year?


Yet another type of scam that targets the elderly: home repair/utility scams

October 15, 2009

Wednesday’s edition of the NWI Times had an article called “Lansing police warning of scam against elderly.” It’s specific to one incident in one location, but the lessons apply to everyone.

This is another con that’s been around forever and is currently experiencing a resurgence. A group of people (usually three men) shows up at your door, claiming to represent a utility company or similar. While two crooks distract the homeowner by “checking the utility box” or something, the other searches the house for cash and valuables.

To me, this is a far worse situation than wiring money to a thief overseas, even though your monetary losses may be smaller. I mean, these people are in your house. If you’ve let them in, then suddenly realize your mistake, and they know you’ve figured them out, you could be in real, immediate, physical danger. A frightened criminal is a dangerous criminal.

Crooks pulling this con usually concentrate on the elderly, so make sure your parents, grandparents, and others know not to let anyone in their house who just shows up on their doorstep, no matter who they claim to be.

If a group of people shows up at your door, asking to be let in to “check” something, politely decline and close and lock your door. If you think there’s the remotest possibility that they might be telling the truth, call the utility company and ask. However, since real utility companies almost never operate in this manner, I’d call the police instead. If they’re really from the utility company, two things will be true:

  1. They won’t run away the second you shut the door
  2. They’ll understand why you reacted as you did, and will be able to prove that they are who they claim to be.

Stay vigilant out there, and make sure any elderly people in your family or neighborhood know about this scheme.


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