Alert for businesses: beware of fake BBB complaint emails

January 18, 2013

I received an email recently that highlights the importance of business owners and employees being aware of various types of fraud activity:

From: Better Business Bureau <[redacted]@newyork.bbb.org>
Subject: Case #28475466
Owner/Manager

The Better Business Bureau has received the above-referenced complaint from one of your customers regarding their dealings with you. The details of the consumer’s concern are included on the reverse. Please review this matter and advise us of your position.

As a neutral third party, the Better Business Bureau can help to resolve the matter. Often complaints are a result of misunderstandings a company wants to know about and correct.

In the interest of time and good customer relations, please provide the BBB with written verification of your position in this matter by January 17, 2013. Your prompt response will allow BBB to be of service to you and your customer in reaching a mutually agreeable resolution. Please inform us if you have contacted your customer directly and already resolved this matter.

The Better Business Bureau develops and maintains Reliability Reports on companies across the United States and Canada . This information is available to the public and is frequently used by potential customers. Your cooperation in responding to this complaint becomes a permanent part of your file with the Better Business Bureau. Failure to promptly give attention to this matter may be reflected in the report we give to consumers about your company.

We encourage you to print this complaint (attached file), answer the questions and respond to us.

We look forward to your prompt attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

BBB Serving Metropolitan New York, Long Island and the Mid-Hudson Region

There was a 102KB file attached to the message named “Complaint Case¬†¬†#28475466.zip”. Except for the fact that it appeared to come from a Better Business Bureau office a thousand miles away, it looked pretty legitimate.

However, looks can be very deceiving.

According to a report from Cisco, the attachment is an executable file that contains malicious code. They don’t specify what that malware is, but given the nature of the message I would guess it’s designed to log keystrokes or use some other method to steal online banking credentials from businesses. Once they’ve got account numbers and passwords, they wire thousands of dollars out of payroll, expense and other accounts, then use their network of (unwitting and witting) money mules to launder the ill-gotten funds.

So here’s the lesson today: if you receive a message like the one above, do not under any circumstances open the attached file. If you think there might be a legitimate complaint from the Better Business Bureau, contact them directly. It’s a general rule, but in this case it applied more specifically to business owners and their employees.


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