Tag Archives: Lottery scam

Things You Didn’t Win: the BMW Lottery

I found this gem in my junk folder the other day. Apparently they’re trying to come up with something other than the usual Microsoft Lottery business, but all this amounts to is a different paint job on an old scam. I guess we’re supposed to think, “Well, that thing about the Microsoft Lottery may have been a scam…but this is totally different! They’re giving me a car, too!”

From: Mr Brian Kelly <info@u.s.a.org>
Subject: BMW LOTTERY DEPARTMENT

BMW LOTTERY DEPARTMENT
5070 WILSHIRE BLVD
LOS ANGELES. CA 90036
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.
EMAIL: Bell4glenn@usa.com
Help Line:+1-850-396-4184

NOTE: If you received this message in your SPAM/BULK folder, that is because of the restrictions implemented by your Internet Service Provider, we (BMW) urge you to treat it genuinely.

Dear Winner,

This is to inform you that you have been selected for a prize of a brand new 2016/2017 Model BMW X5 SUV and a Check of $3,500,000.00 USD from the international balloting programs held on the 2nd section in the UNITED STATE OF AMERICA.

Description of prize vehicle;
The X5 has enough luxurious space for everybody. Rear Comfort seats with enhanced foam padding offer 3” of forward/backward movement, putting passengers in the perfect position to utilize a DVD drive and two optional 10.2” LCD screens. An optional third row seat offers extended capacity, and includes its own
climate control.

Options: With one of BMW’s largest cargo spaces, you’ll find it hard to run out of anything. The X5’s rear seats split 40/20/40, folding away to convert 35.8 cubic feet of trunk space in to a full 76.7 cubic feet. Details like two cargo rails, four fastening points, a tensioning strap, and a rear cargo net add enough function to store it all.

The optional Wi-Fi Hotspot keeps you connected to everything you love whether you’re on-the-go or far off the beaten path. Included with the Wi-Fi Hotspot, a Wireless Charging Pocket will keep you
fully charged anywhere the road may lead.

The selection process was carried out through random selection in our computerized email selection system (ESS) from a database of over 250,000 email addresses drawn from all the continents of the world which you were selected.

The BMW Lottery is approved by the British Gaming Board and also Licensed by the International Association of Gaming Regulators (IAGR). To begin the processing of your prize you are to contact our fiduciary claims department for more information as regards procedures to the claim of your prize.

Name: Mr.Glenn Bell
Email: Bell4glenn@usa.com

Contact him by providing him with your secret pin code Number
BMW:255125HGDY03/23.

You are also advised to provide him with the under listed information as soon as possible:

1. Name In Full :
2. Residential Address :
3. Nationality :
4. Age :
5. Sex
6. Occupation :
7. Direct Phone :
8. Present Country :
9. Email address :
10. BMW Winning Code:BMWLOTTERY577648/001

Please you are to provide him with the above listed details as soon as possible so he can begin with the processing of your prize winnings.

Congratulations again from all our staff and thank you for being part of our promotional program.

Mrs. Rachael Adams.

THE DIRECTOR PROMOTIONS
BMW LOTTERY DEPARTMENT
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Interestingly, the physical address listed is for an actual BMW dealership in Beverly Hills. I wonder how many weird letters they’ve received from people who opted to print out the requested information and mail it, instead of using email as instructed.

I think my favorite detail is the “NOTE” right at the beginning; “If this was in your junk email folder, it’s YOUR fault. Not the fact that this is the very definition of junk.”

As always, there is only one correct response, which is to ignore and delete.

Let’s kick off the long weekend with a derpy lottery scam

Many of us (here in the States, anyway) will spend today looking forward to a nice three-day weekend, visions of grilled meat, open-wheel race cars and (if you’re like me) binge-watching the entire fourth season of Arrested Development on Netflix dancing in their heads.

Seems like a good time for a “fun” sort of post, so let’s snark at a bad lottery scam email I received this morning:

From: [redacted]@co.pg.md.us
Subject: ! Are You Aware!!

Your email has been announced the winner of the Microsoft E-mail Sweepstakes of 5.6, Million Pounds. Please send these informations:
Full Name:
Address:
Tel / Mobile No.:
Country:
Occupation:
Sex / Age:
Alternative E-mail:
Contact Mrs. Kathrin Rogers: { Kath.rogers@msn.com<mailto:kath.rogers@msn.com> } OR { Kath.rogers@rogers.com<mailto:kath.rogers@rogers.com> } with details. Sincerely, Josphine B. Clay
(Microsoft Management Board, Copyright 1991-2013)

—————————————————————————————

This E-mail and any of its attachments may contain Prince George’s
County Government or Prince George’s County 7th Judicial Circuit
Court proprietary information or Protected Health Information,
which is privileged and confidential. This E-mail is intended
solely for the use of the individual or entity to which it is
addressed. If you are not the intended recipient of this E-mail,
you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution,
copying, or action taken in relation to the contents of and
attachments to this E-mail is strictly prohibited by federal law
and may expose you to civil and/or criminal penalties. If you have
received this E-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately
and permanently delete the original and any copy of this E-mail and
any printout.

Oh, where to even begin?

For one thing, it doesn’t say I won anything. My email, on the other had, has won 5.6 million pounds. Fat lot of good it will do.

Also: pounds? Microsoft, based in Redmond, Washington, conducts business in pounds? Sure. Whatever.

“Please send these informations.” Uh-huh. Because Microsoft doesn’t have enough money to hire people who use proper grammar.

! Are You Aware!! Um, ?No I’m Am Not ! !!

Why would a message about a Microsoft sweepstakes come from a Prince George’s County, Maryland email address?

Why would the disclaimer refer to said county, and not, oh…I don’t know…maybe Microsoft?

Finally: there is absolutely no such thing as a Microsoft E-Mail Sweepstakes, nor has there ever been, and nor will there ever be. But if you’ve been reading this site for a while, you already knew that one, didn’t you?

Have a good weekend. Stay vigilant. (Also, try grilling corn with garlic butter and without wrapping it in foil if you’re cooking out this weekend. You have to move it around a lot to avoid flare-ups and burnt corn, but dude…seriously, you’ll never do it the old way again.)

British Telecoms Lottery Scam

I think just about everyone at REGIONAL received this message this morning:

From: guido13@web.de
To: winners@btlottery.com
Sent: Monday, February 07, 2011 4:42 AM
Subject: Confirmed Today And Must Be Claimed Immediately

BRITISH TELECOMS PROMOTION DEPARTMENT.
The sum of $1 Million USD has been awarded to you by the BRITISH TELECOMS LOTTERY, Fill the form below for more details and E-MAIL: TO (units291@gmail.com),

1. YOUR FULL NAME:
2. YOUR FULL ADDRESS:
3. YOUR MOBILE PHONE NUMBER:
4. YOUR AGE:
5. CURRENT OCCUPATION:

Yours Faithfully,
BRITISH TELECOMS PROMOTION DEPARTMENT.

Interesting.

Actually, it’s really not. It’s such a hackneyed format for a lottery scam email, there’s almost nothing to say about it.

The history of British Telecom, now known as BT Group, is much more interesting than this scam. Did you know they’re the world’s oldest telecommunications company? They emerged from an amalgamation of 19th Century telegraph companies in the United Kingdom, including the Electric Telegraph Company, the world’s first.

They also, in no way, shape or form, are in the business of running lotteries, or sending out million dollar prizes to random people. Being British, I’d guess they’re not in the habit of trafficking in U.S. Dollars much to begin with. Even if they were, I’m guessing they’d use “BT Group” in their messages, instead of “British Telecoms,” an incorrect pluralization of a corporate identity they haven’t used since 1991. They also would probably not use Gmail or United Internet AG (web.de) email accounts, seeing as how BT Group is itself an Internet service provider.

Dear fraud perpetrators: be more interesting next time.

Shoppers Sweepstakes Lottery: haven’t we been here before?

It looks like another lottery scam is making the rounds in North Carolina and Pennsylvania. This time, people are receiving letters that tell them they’ve won $125,000 in something called the “Shoppers Sweepstakes Lottery.”

There’s a cashier’s check enclosed, naturally, for $3,875, drawn off Evansville Teachers FCU.

The instructions are (say it with me, now) to cash the check and wire $2,875 back to the company, which in this case is “Dominion Investment Securities, Inc.”

To me, this is all déjà vu, that feeling you’ve been somewhere before. This is probably because this lottery scam is exactly like countless others I’ve seen over the past couple years.

Just make sure you don’t go all jamais vu if you get one of these letters. That’s the opposite of déjà vu—you’ve seen something a million times, but you feel like it’s the first time you’ve ever been there.

Tell your friends, tell your neighbors: please don’t feed the con artists.