Tag Archives: JavaScript

Having a dedicated computer for online banking

Clipart of bills and coins
Image via Wikipedia

Here’s a great idea that doesn’t get talked about enough: having a computer you use only for online banking and other financial activities, and a different computer for games, music and general Internet usage.

It seems like an expensive route to have two separate computers, but think about it—your financial machine only has to be just powerful enough to handle an operating system, an Internet connection and a web browser. You don’t need massive amounts of RAM or a great (or even particularly good) video card. You could probably even find a used laptop running Windows XP (if you’re a PC user; however I would not recommend Windows Vista) if you poke around. Install your antivirus software and Mozilla Firefox with the NoScript plugin, and you’re ready to go. I would also recommend setting up a separate email address for anything related to finances, and only check it with your financial computer.

What this does is keeps your financial activities separate from everything else; you’re not likely to encounter malware by logging in to your credit card providers or financial institution’s website. In the meantime, if you run into malware trouble on your “fun” computer while mucking about on the Intertubes, the damage will be limited. Your banking passwords won’t get snagged by a keylogger you picked up on an infected website, even if your Facebook password does.

Of course, buying a separate computer is going to cost money whether you go new or used, and in any case you have to keep your security software up-to-date on both machines. It’s not an option for everyone. However, if you can swing a few hundred bucks for a dedicated banking computer and some good security software, it’s just one more layer of protection.

Adobe Reader phishing emails: this is not how Adobe sends updates

According to a recent alert, phishing emails regarding updates to the Adobe Reader have been making the rounds.

This is where knowing a little something about software can help you avoid a scam, because Adobe doesn’t send out update information via email. In fact, I can’t think of a software company that does. This is one of those cases where people who might otherwise never click a link in an unexpected email might let their guard down. Don’t do it. There’s a reason I always say “never”.

When a new security patch for the Reader, or a whole new version becomes available, the program itself will detect it automatically. Or, if you want to download it manually, you can visit http://get.adobe.com/reader/. I would uncheck that “Free McAfee Security Scan Plus” box on the right, though. I’m not a fan of “bonus” software like toolbars and other junk when you download things, so that’s sort of a matter of principle. Plus, if you’ve got a different brand of security software installed, the McAfee download might fight with it. Virus scanners always seem to detect each other as viruses.

There is a possible security issue with the Adobe Reader that you should know about. For some reason, they decided to add JavaScript functionality to the Reader. This was later shown to be an easy avenue for hackers to access your computer. I’m pretty sure the latest versions have fixed this issue, but I still turn it off just in case.

All you have to do is click “Edit” at the top of the screen, then select “Preferences…” Find “JavaScript” in the menu on your left. Click that, and there will be a box that says “Enable Acrobat JavaScript.” UNcheck it, click “OK”, and you’re done.

Another alternative is to just use a different software altogether, which is what I do. I like the Foxit Reader, but I disable JavaScript there as well.

Don’t get me wrong—I love most of Adobe’s other products (Illustrator and Photoshop in particular). I just don’t quite grok why they put this functionality into the Reader.