Tag Archives: Internet Explorer

A fictional story about a guy who did everything wrong one day

Hi there.

My name is Johnny, and I had a busy day today.

I woke up around eight because I had a new job as a secret shopper. I got an email a couple weeks ago, and they hired me on the spot when I responded. Yesterday, an envelope arrived with a check and my first assignment.

I headed to my bank around nine. At first, the teller didn’t want to cash the check because I only had six bucks in my account, but I whined and got in her face and demanded to talk to the manager until she relented. “That’s a cashier’s check,” I told her in no uncertain terms. “Those are the same as cash.”

I left the bank with $2,700 in my pocket and headed to the nearest Western Union location. The guy there kept asking me questions about the money I was wiring, so I finally told him it was for a relative in Canada, just like the secret shopping company told me to do. It was a little annoying the way he wouldn’t leave me alone. I’m going to put that in my report for sure.

By the time I was done, it was only ten o’clock. I had made $150 for less than an hour of work! I could get used to this lifestyle. I decided to head home.

The phone was ringing when I came in the door. I ran to answer, and this guy from the county courthouse was telling me I was going to be arrested for not appearing for jury duty.

“But I never got a letter that said anything about jury duty,” I said.

“That doesn’t matter,” he replied. “The fact is that you didn’t show, and an officer will be stopping by later today to make the arrest.”

“But…isn’t there some way I could just do jury duty another time? I didn’t miss on purpose.”

“Let me see what I can do, sir,” the man said. After a minute on hold, he told me I could just pay a fine and the whole thing would be taken care of. I gave him my name, date of birth, Social Security number and some credit card information to pay the fine. I was relieved when I hung up the phone. Crisis averted.

The mail had arrived, but it was nothing but a pile of credit card offers. I threw these in the trash unopened. Nobody’s going to rip me off.

I sat down on the sofa to unwind with some TV. It was mostly talk shows at that time of morning, but there was a news broadcast between commercials that caught my eye. It gave some phone number you could call to get your debts eliminated. I have a lot of debt, so I wrote down the number. It seemed like a strange place for a news alert, during the commercials, but whatever. There was a ticker on the screen and some footage of the President, so it must be some kind government program, right?

I went to the computer to write up my report for the secret shopping job. I hate my computer. It came with this virus protection software, but the only thing it’s done for the past two years is tell me my subscription is expired. It’s annoying. Plus, when I opened my web browser (Internet Explorer 6) and tried to visit a website, this window popped up offering a free virus scan. I clicked “OK” and it found like ten infections. The software that came with my computer doesn’t even work!

After the scan, there was a window that wouldn’t go away, so I just closed the browser and checked my email. There, a miracle happened. It turns out I was entered in the lottery up in Canada, and I won! $2,500,000, all for me. I called the claims agent right away. It turns out there are some taxes and fees I have to pay first, but that’s okay—they’re going to mail me a check. I think I may retire from secret shopping. After all, with two-and-a-half million, I’m going to be pretty much set for life.

I’m not going to tell anyone about it, though. I don’t want everybody asking me for money.

My name is Johnny, and I made at least ten mistakes today, if not more. Can you spot them all?

Online security: teach your children well.

I don’t have any kids yet, but I know a few people who do.

Okay, so I know more than a few. I know many, and almost all of them have something in common: their computers are constantly being infected with viruses, trojans and other types of malware. I’m not talking about the occasional adware popup or tracking cookie—these machines are usually just crawling with malicious software.

There’s sort of an old myth that your twelve year old is always going to know more about the computer than you. Perhaps this is true when it comes to first-person shooters and making goofy videos, but kids don’t know everything about computers, and security is one of those areas where they generally seem to lack the fundamentals.

Of course, they’re invincible, too. There’s always that. Ask them sometime; “Is it even possible that you might run into a virus on the Internet?” They’ll probably look at you like you’re an idiot. Again.

But it happens, and it seems to happen a lot. You’ve got to educate your kids about malicious software, because a keylogger doesn’t care who downloads itself; it’s going to send login and password information, whether it’s to a Facebook profile (bad news) or your financial accounts (worse).

First, if you’ve got kids using the Internet, try to keep an eye on them at least some of the time. Since this is impossible, though, make sure you’re using Firefox with the NoScript plug-in. No Internet Explorer! There are more holes in that browser than a hunk of Swiss.

Secondly, learn about the various dangers yourself, and make sure you warn your kids. No kid is going to be able to resist “lol is this you?” or “lol funny video” followed by a shortened URL, unless someone tells him that such links lead only to malware.

Thirdly, obtain the burliest antivirus and firewall software you can afford, and pay the money to keep it updated. This is vital anyway, but if you’ve got kids clicking a mile a minute on Facebook and Twitter, you really need to take maximum precautions.

I suppose you could try to limit your kids’ access to the Internet, but you could also try to wrestle a grizzly bear while you’re at it. Good luck with that one.

Finally, consider getting your own computer or laptop that the kids aren’t allowed to even touch, and use that one for business and banking. At least your accounts will be safe(r), assuming you’re taking the necessary precautions on this computer as well.

Okay, does this post officially put me in the “old person complaining about young people” camp? It does sort of have that “I tell ya, the kids today, with their Facebooks and their Twitters,” flavor doesn’t it?

I don’t know, but I know it’s important to get your kids hip to the dangers of malware as soon as you can. Your own financial security may depend on it.

Microsoft Internet Explorer vs. Mozilla Firefox: which browser is safer?

Just the other day, news of a pretty major hole in Internet Explorer versions 6 and 7 was made public (no word on whether or not the vulnerability applies to version 8, which is the latest one at this time).

Why did the “hacker” in question make this information public? Some people might assume he or she wants to cause widespread chaos, but I actually think it’s good to publicly post things like this. This forces Microsoft to come up with a patch for the problem as soon as possible.

However, I recently decided I’m sort of done with always waiting for Microsoft to patch browser software that has more holes than a hunk of Swiss, and made the switch to Mozilla Firefox.

I can’t really give you the tech-head reasons why I feel Firefox is the better, safer browser (mostly because I’m not much of a tech-head), but a large portion of the Internet-savvy population agrees that it’s the way to go.

For one thing, Firefox is “open source” software. A whole community of programmers is constantly making improvements to it. Should the rare security vulnerability come to light, it’s fixed in record time.

Microsoft is at a disadvantage here. Being a huge corporation with shareholders’ interests as their primary concern, they have multiple levels of bureaucracy to work through before they can release anything. I’m sure even a simple security patch is met with resistance—”This will mean publicly admitting a weakness, which could hurt share prices!”

I’m not saying Microsoft couldn’t release a great browser right out of the box, I just think that with their deadlines and the need to think about profitability above all else, they tend to rush releases before everything is ready.

The cool thing about Firefox is that there are all kinds of plug-ins (or “add-ons”) available. Right now, I run the latest version of Firefox with a plug-in called “NoScript.” This nifty little program starts you off by blocking ALL Flash, Java and JavaScript programs. As you visit websites, you get to choose whether or not to allow it to run all, some, or none of the scripts embedded in the site.

For example, if you visit Facebook, it will start by blocking every script. Then you can select “Allow facebook.com” to run scripts. There will usually be several different websites per page running scripts, so you can select whether or not you trust them. If you don’t like the look of one of the URLs, simply don’t allow that site to run code, or search for it on Google to find out what it is (for example, I don’t let Fastclick.net run scripts. Ever).

There are some other good plug-ins, most of which I haven’t looked at. Some block pop-ups, some probably don’t work too great at all. The Firefox site has a big list of available add-ons.

There are a million better articles than this one about “Internet Explorer vs. Firefox” (just do a Google search), but if you’re ready to switch now, go download Firefox here and get the NoScript plug-in here.