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How to Freeze Your Credit

The recent Equifax data breach exposed the personal identifying information of at least 143 million U.S. consumers, which has led to a wider interest in placing a “security freeze” on credit reports (a.k.a. “freezing your credit”).

A security freeze prevents new credit accounts from being opened using your personal information, unless you lift the freeze in advance of applying for credit. This is accomplished using a PIN that either you or the credit bureaus create when placing the original freeze. This means that a freeze can stop an identity thief from creating new lines of credit, even if they already have all of your information.

A credit freeze is an important tool in preventing one type of identity theft, but does not prevent existing accounts from being accessed with stolen credentials, fraudulent credit or debit card transactions, employment or medical identity theft, or the filing of fraudulent tax returns. In other words, even after you place a security freeze, you still have to remain aware of the risks of identity theft.

There are three major credit bureaus and one minor. Here is where to go for each one, as well as some notes (information is accurate as of 10/2/2017, but websites may be updated in the future):

TransUnion: https://www.transunion.com/credit-freeze/place-credit-freeze2

Notes: use the “Click to initiate freeze process” link (last item under the “How Do I Decide What to Do?” table). Note that a “lock” is different from a freeze; what you want is a freeze. TransUnion requires you to create an account with a password, then you can place the freeze and create your PIN. To temporarily lift the freeze, log in at https://freeze.transunion.com.

Experian: http://experian.com/freeze

Notes: Experian is probably the easiest of the four to use, with the “Add a security freeze” option prominently displayed. You can create your own PIN, or have the site generate one for you. You can also choose whether to print your receipt or have it emailed to you. Double-check that your email address is correct if you choose this option! Visit the same site to temporarily lift the freeze.

Equifax: https://www.freeze.equifax.com

Notes: creates a “one-time PDF” which contains your PIN (the site generates it for you). Make sure you’ve got a PDF reader installed beforehand so you can view the file (Adobe and Foxit are popular free choices). Visit the same site to lift a freeze.

Innovis: https://www.innovis.com/personal/securityFreeze

Notes: Innovis sends your PIN via postal mail around 10 business days after you place the freeze. To lift the freeze, visit the same website and follow the instructions.