Tag Archives: Fraud

Nigerian 419 email scams live on

I saw this one just today. It’s a doozy:

From: The Desk Of Mr. James Dike
Reference: GTBank Plc.
Address: 402, Lagos-Abeokuta Expressway, Abule-Egba, Lagos State, Nigeria.

Attention: $10.5M ATM Fund Beneficiary,

I am Mr. James Dike, the new appointed ATM Head of Operation Department Guaranty Trust Bank Nigeria PLC, I resumed to this office on the 1st of this month and For your information i have been empowered and instructed by the new elected President Federal Republic of Nigeria Gen. Muhammadu Buhari to pay all outstanding debt payment to the rightful beneficiaries and summit my payment report to his office with immediate effect and any payment that is not paid before the end of this month will be cancelled and the fund will be returned to the Federal Reserve Oil Account.

So, during my official research last week I discovered an abandoned ATM Master card valued sum of $10.5Million with card number 5321452123409380 belonging to you as the rightfully intimate beneficiary. I tried to know why this card have not been released to you but I was told that the formal ATM head of operation who left this office two months ago withhold your card for his own personal use without knowing that I will not approve or support him to take your card.

Now that your ATM Master card is still available for you to pick it up here in our bank. I want to know how you wish to receive your ATM card along with your four digits pin code number. You can come down here in our bank to pick up your card direct from my office or alternatively it can be send to your address through any registered reliable courier service company that you will take care of the courier charge. I don’t know the cost of shipping the card to you but if you permit me I can make an inquiry from the courier shipment company to find out the cost, but in that case you will be required to forward to me your shipment address to enable me find out the shipment cost to your location.

Your direct telephone number and address will be needed and more details of your ATM Master card payment will be made known to you as soon as I receive your swift positive response, to enable you know the amount programmed for your ATM Master Card daily withdrawal.I will send your ATM master card information including your Card Pin Code as soon as you declare your choice of receiving your ATM card so as to enable you receive your card and start making use of it to withdraw at any ATM card machine all over the world as programmed.

Do not hesitate to call me on +234 802-850-0459 as soon as you read this mail.

Thanks for your co-operation.

Yours Faithfully,
Mr. James Dike
ATM Head of Operation Department
Guaranty Trust Bank Nigeria Plc.
Tel: +234 802-850-0459.

A lot of us have become jaded when it comes to the old Nigerian 419 scam. Even though this one takes a different angle and doesn’t mention an exiled prince, for many of us, it’s easy to see through. We probably wouldn’t even read it…”$10.5M” in the subject line would be enough to trigger our “delete” reflex.

But somebody still falls for it. If they didn’t, these emails wouldn’t happen anymore. So while you may have become almost flippant about the Nigerian 419 scam, remember that there are still people who haven’t heard about it yet. If someone you know starts talking about an impending payout from a mysterious source, or mentions their plans to wire money overseas, it might be time to educate him or her.

Free Disney Vacation Scam Alert

If you haven’t already, at some point very soon you are going to see this image on Facebook:


The hook is this: like the photo, share it, then visit a website to enter a contest for a free Disney World vacation.

Here’s the problem: the Facebook page this image resides on is NOT the official Disney World page. It is an impostor designed to trick users into liking the page. Once enough people have done so, the page content will be changed to push other scams into the news feeds of the people who liked the Disney page.

Now, why am I such a downer? Why am I trying so hard to make people sad? How do I know it’s a fake Disney page?

Well, look at this screenshot for a moment (click to see it full-size):


Do you see what it says next to the profile picture? I’ll zoom in a little so you can read it better (click for full size):


It says “Walt Disney-World.”.

Notice the dash.

Notice the period.

Notice the category: “Transport/Freight.”

Notice the lack of the blue “Verified Page” checkmark next to the name.

Do you think for one moment that a company the size of Disney would have ITS OWN NAME written incorrectly on its own Facebook page? Look at any official Disney website or product. Do you see “Walt Disney-World.” anywhere?

Do you see Walt Disney World train cars and semi trailers all over America’s railroad tracks and roadways, delivering jars of pickle relish and car parts and textiles? No? That’s because Disney World is a theme park, not a transportation and freight business.

Do you believe Disney World’s official Facebook page would have 20,000 likes (as of today) and ONE lousy post? And no link to the official Disney World website?

These, and a dozen other points, are your free ticket to knowing that this Facebook page and offer are a scam.

Go look at Walt Disney World’s official Facebook page. Notice:

  • 14 million likes
  • The name is correctly punctuated (which is to say there is NO punctuation)
  • The category is listed as “Theme Park,” which is correct
  • The checkmark next to “Walt Disney World.” This means Facebook has verified that the page is official. You can hold your mouse over the checkmark and a little window will pop up that says “Verified Page”
  • Posts going back to 2009
  • Multiple posts, pretty much every day

I’m taking a pretty emphatic tone because I want people to stop falling for fake Facebook pages. I’m tired of seeing people I know get taken in by this stuff because it helps crooks spread spam and fraud to millions of people. If you see this photo and post in your Facebook newsfeed, please do the following:

  • DO NOT SHARE, LIKE OR COMMENT ON the page yourself
  • Tell whoever shared it or posted it that it is a scam and that they need to unlike the page right away; point them to the real Disney World page if they don’t believe you
  • Go to the fake page and Report it as fraudulent to Facebook
  • Share this article, or this one from the Consumerist if you can’t bring yourself to take my word for it

I don’t Facebook much anymore, but I’ve always lived by an “If it’s being shared a lot on Facebook, it’s probably not true” code. It’s a pretty accurate rule, and the stuff that IS true you’ll hear from credible sources eventually anyway.



Watch out for fake utility workers

It seems like as good a time as any to once again remind everyone to beware of burglars posing as utility company workers.

The usual setup starts with a knock on the door. The person standing on your doorstep claims to work for the electric or gas company, telephone company, or some other utility. They tell you they are in your neighborhood working on some or other problem, or performing routine maintenance, and ask to be shown to your circuit breaker (or whatever piece of hardware makes sense). Often they’ll even look like a real utility company employee, with a clipboard, nametag and possibly even a uniform.

While you’re showing them to the circuit breaker-or-whatever, an accomplice you didn’t see slips into your house looking for valuables or money.

It doesn’t really matter which type of company they claim to represent, the important thing to remember is that if a utility provider is going to need access to the inside of your house (which they almost never will), they will contact you ahead of time. They will not show up unannounced.

If someone is at your door and you were not contacted in advance, ask to see a badge or official identification, which they should gladly provide. Then politely ask them to wait while you close your door, lock it, lock any other doors, and call the utility company to ask if they’ve sent people to your house. Whatever you do, don’t let them in or call them out on being a crook. This type of scam differs from most in that it involves actual, physical proximity to the perpetrators, which can put you in danger of bodily harm.

Utility worker scams often target senior citizens, so make sure your friends, family and neighbors are aware of this type of crime, what to watch for and how to respond.

Beware of unsolicited offers

The phone rings. A caller identifies himself as representing a well-known and trusted local business. He’s calling to offer you a discount on their services.

“Hey, great, I need those services anyway,” you think, and agree to the offer and arrange for the work to take place.

And another scam is set in motion.

It’s been happening here in Northwest Indiana. A heating/cooling contractor from Illinois (with an F rating at the Better Business Bureau, maybe not-quite-incidentally) has  apparently been calling homeowners and claiming to be a well-known local business (with an A+ rating, also maybe not-quite-incidentally), with an offer for discounted duct cleaning. Workers show up, perform a shoddy duct-cleaning, then ask for more than the agreed-upon price.

So my fraud prevention tip today is this: be wary of unsolicited offers from local businesses. If you get a call, make sure to double-check with the actual business before you agree to anything. Use an official, published number from the real company’s website or trusted online source (or the phone book, if you didn’t just carry it directly from your front porch to the recycling bin) instead of the number that shows up on caller ID or the number given by the caller. If there’s a discrepancy, it could be a different (and unscrupulous) business posing as the real one.

Overpayment scams affect businesses, too

I thought I was onto some clever application of the “duck test” for the title of this post, about how “if it looks like a scam and quacks like a scam,” but I really couldn’t make it sound anything other than monstrously insane, so I dropped it and went with the title you see above.

Anyway, the old repayment scam has been explained a thousand times here, there and everywhere. You’re selling something on Craigslist (for example), and a buyer contacts you, usually from out of state. They send their payment, but instead of $200, it’s a cashier’s check for $3,200. “Cash it and use the extra for shipping, then wire the rest back to me,” they say when you contact them.

What happens next is fairly predictable: you cash the check, send the item, wire the excess money (thousands of dollars) to someone, then find out a week later that it was a counterfeit check and that you’re on the hook for the loss caused to your financial institution.

But did you know that scammers also target businesses with the same tactic?

And if you’re a business owner, you might fall for it because what might strike you as suspicious during a private sale might seem less so in a business context. I’ve heard of several cases where retail businesses, attorneys and rental property owners have been victimized by this scam.

However, the principle applies in every context, whether in a person-to-person or a business transaction: if someone sends you a cashier’s check and tells you to cash it and wire money back to them, you’re almost always dealing with a con artist.

Credit Card Scam Alert: Ignore that offer from AmTrade International Bank

There is a new scam showing up in mailboxes.

It takes the form of an offer for a “secure” credit card, and it targets people with low credit scores or other financial issues.

A “secure” credit card is a credit card where the cardholder puts up some of their own money as collateral against the credit line. It allows lenders to extend credit to higher-risk consumers at a lower annual percentage rate, and can actually be a good tool for rebuilding credit (timely payment of debts makes up a large portion of your credit score). We actually offer a secured credit card here at REGIONAL. They’re a legitimate financial tool.

Except for when they’re used as the basis for a scam.

This one comes from AmTrade International Bank, with an implied connection to Credit One Bank, N.A. (there is none). Victims select a card with either a $1,500 or $3,600 credit limit, and then send in $500 or $900 (respectively) as “collateral” for the credit lines.

And the credit cards never arrive. At its core, this is the simplest form of scam: take money, disappear.

This exact same scam showed up earlier in the year, from Freedom 1st National Bank, which also implied a link to Credit One. In both cases, victims instantly found themselves robbed of either $500 or $900.

If you get offers for pre-approved credit cards in the mail, it is vital to verify all claims before making a purchase decision and sending personal information and money.

In fact, I’ll just put it out there now: don’t respond to unsolicited pre-approved offers for “secure” credit cards, at all.

Also, never just send money to an unknown entity, for any reason.

This scam is going to keep popping up, with different fake banks running it each time, and law enforcement is going be playing whack-a-mole for quite some time. In the meantime, it’s on each of us to look out for ourselves.

Read more:


File Under “Things That Were Just a Matter of Time.” New scams using Affordable Care Act to harvest personal information.

Okay, so if you live in these United States, you may have heard of a controversial little thing called the Affordable Care Act.

Yeah, okay, before you head to the bottom of the page to sound off, I’ve already turned comments off for this post. I’m not here to express my opinion of the legislation, and I’m not fielding others’, either. Our opinions are irrelevant for the moment. Besides, certain post topics generate TONS of bot-generated spam comments, and I have a hunch this might be one of them (you should’ve seen how many came in when I wrote about Açaí berry scams a few years ago…it was seriously ridiculous).

Here’s all we need to know, and it’s pretty easy to agree upon: The Affordable Care Act is a Thing That Exists. (That’s only a matter of opinion if you’re into really fabric-of-universe-level philosophical discussions.)

And, as a Thing That Exists, it was only a matter of time before someone started up a scam based upon it.

Lo and behold, the FTC is reporting exactly that. Scammers are calling potential victims to “verify” information. For example, “So I see here that your routing number is __________, is that correct? Okay, good, so now we just need your account number…”

Here’s the deal with the Affordable Care Act: if you’re one of the people who is going to need to use the exchanges to obtain insurance, you’re going to be the one contacting them. According to the FTC report, “If someone who claims to be from the government calls and asks for your personal information, hang up. It’s a scam. The government and legitimate organizations you do business with already have the information they need and will not ask you for it.”

That sums it up pretty nicely, both in this specific instance and as a general rule.

Don’t try to get something for nothing

Sometimes you walk a fine line when you’re writing about how-to-not-get-swindled. On one hand, a victim is a victim, and it’s not nice to place blame on them. On the other, there are scams that prey upon some all-too-human tendencies  (which we all have within us, make no mistake about it) to be a little avaricious.

When it comes to this category of scams, here’s the rule: don’t try to get something for nothing.

Think about all the fake iPad scams you’ve heard about. A guy approaches you at a gas station and offers to sell you a brand new iPad for a super-low price. You find out later that the box contains a mirror or some other non-iPad object.

It’s no fun to get conned, but ask yourself: is there anything about a guy selling iPads at a gas station that doesn’t scream “This is not legit!” when you really think about it? Apple doesn’t sell its products from cars at filling stations.This is either a scam or an attempt to unload stolen goods. You’re almost better off with the mirror.

What about the Pigeon Drop scheme? Forget the whole “Let’s have this person hold your good-faith money while we do this-or-that to divvy up this satchel of cash we found” angle…how many movies do you have to watch to know that “satchel full of money” equals “drug dealers/hit men/bank heists/things you don’t want to get within ten miles of”? Honest people who find big stashes of currency contact law enforcement, because there’s no way that cash is not evidence of some major crime. It couldn’t be more obvious if it was in a big white sack with a huge dollar sign printed on it.

The rule applies to all manner of scams and rip-offs. $437 sounds a bit steep for an hour of work, doesn’t it? Then don’t fall for the secret shopper scams. Brand-name prescription drugs for a tenth of the cost? Sounds too good to be true! That’s because it is.

We’re all looking out for ourselves on some level. If I see a ten-dollar bill bouncing merrily down the sidewalk on a windy day, I’ll pick it up. But I’ll also check around me to make sure nobody was chasing it, or standing there with that distraught look that can only mean one thing: their tenner just blew away. (For the record: this never happens to me…I’m much more likely to be the one with the distraught face.)

However, moving forward, remember this: if someone approaches you offering something for nothing (or next to it), take warning. You’re either about to be scammed or become an accomplice.

Lottery scam originates from 876 area code (Jamaica)

It’s an old scam with a slight twist: lottery scammers based in Jamaica are using threats of physical violence to get victims to wire money.

Usually if you ignore a scam, that’s the end of it. Apparently this group takes it really personally, though; if a potential victim refuses to bite, they make threats. At that point, I suppose the whole “you won the lottery” angle is abandoned and it just becomes pure extortion.

Sometimes I make really general statements, and I’m going to do it again here: unless you personally know someone who lives in Jamaica or own/work for a company that does business in the country, don’t even answer phone calls from the 876 area code. There are exactly zero good reasons you should be getting out-of-the-blue phone calls from random people in Jamaica. The St. Louis BBB has some additional information about this scam.