Tag Archives: Criminal Identity Theft

Mistaken identity arrests: it happens a lot more often than you’d think.

According to an item posted on CNN, cases of mistaken identity in criminal arrests happen a lot more often than you might think.

The specific case highlighted in the article was not related to identity theft; rather, the victim simply had a very similar name to that of a robbery suspect. However, she spent five days in jail before her husband was able to bail her out. It also took two years to get her criminal record expunged.

Mistakes like this are apparently relatively common, due to identity theft and errors. You might not be able to control who has a name just like yours, or who types in a name incorrectly, but you can still take steps to prevent identity theft that could lead to your wrongful arrest. It may not eliminate the possibility, but at least you can try to minimize it.

At the very least, the article shows that getting arrested for something you didn’t do isn’t fun. Stay vigilant.

How to avoid employment identity theft.

I’ve said many times before that not all identity theft is strictly financial, although other types of theft may have financial implications.

Medical identity theft is used to obtain services or to bilk insurance companies out of money for services that were never given. It can lead to collections activity against the victim, and at worse, false medical records that could be hazardous to the victim’s life.

Criminal identity theft can lead to victims being incarcerated and stuck with false arrest records that are difficult to expunge. It can lead to loss of job opportunities, and in some cases the victim has to hire a criminal defense attorney to get the situation under control.

Employment identity theft can, on the surface, seem like an almost victimless crime. When someone simply uses your personal information to obtain a job, you might not necessarily even find out unless you happen to apply for a position with the same employer (which has happened before). In fact, I’m sure that a lot of the people who actually use stolen information to get jobs think of it as a victimless crime.

However, what happens if the person using your identity to get a job doesn’t pay taxes on their earnings? The IRS will come looking for you.

One of the enduring myths of identity theft is that the person who steals your information is going to be the same person who uses it. This used to be more or less true, in the days before the Internet made things easier for criminals. These days, a more likely scenario for employment identity theft is that one entity steals information from a lot of different people, then sells it to those who need it. As I’ve often said, this is the realm of organized crime. The person who snags your Social Security Number through illicit means is just a middleman.

In other words, the standard rules apply; guard your SSN and be cautious about who you give it to.

Fraudulent job listings are a major source for this form of “retail” identity theft. You have to be extremely careful when applying for jobs online, especially during these times of high unemployment. However, don’t let your guard down when the economy recovers. This stuff is always out there.

First, never give your Social Security Number before a job interview. Any employer talking about a “preliminary background check” is already breaking the law, so you know right away that something is wrong. The second they speak of a preliminary check, refuse and move on.

Second, never provide financial information. If it’s a job that requires a credit check before hiring, they don’t need account numbers for that. They’ll need your Social Security Number, but by the time you’re actually sitting in an office with an interviewer, surrounded by employees, you’re a little safer in giving them the information. Thieves don’t often set up actual office premises—it’s too much work.

Third, be extremely vigilant when applying for jobs online. Do your homework, check up on the company, make sure any emails are from company accounts (like [nameofcompany].[com/org/net]), not free personal addresses (live.com, gmail.com, yahoo.com, etc.). Online application forms are an easy way for fraudulent web sites to harvest personal information. If they’re asking for your Social Security Number, STOP.

Finally, these are far more “work at home” scams on the Internet (and in the Classifieds, in your Inbox and stapled to telephone poles) than there are legitimate home-based job opportunities—the ratio is 54-to-1, according to one source. This means that if you’re looking at an online work-at-home offer, there is a 98% chance that it’s a scam and possibly a front for an identity theft ring. In other words, don’t even bother.

If you’re serious about working from home, your best bet is to contact a staffing agency (preferably a local one with an actual, physical office) and see if they have any leads. Or, you can start your own business and create your own income model. You either have to telecommute (traditional job, only you don’t go to the office much) or create something that people want (whether a product, information, or entertainment content) on your own, and figure out how to monetize it.

Criminal Identity Theft: Indiana needs to get with the program.

Let’s set up a little scenario here.

Someone steals your identity and creates false identification using your information. This person then commits a crime, for which he is later arrested. He gives your name, SSN, address and other information to the police during the arrest.

The criminal then bonds out, but is due to appear in court on a certain date. Naturally, he never shows up. The police mount a search, which leads them directly to your front door.

A complete mess ensues.

At some point, however, probably after a massive amount of humiliation and stress (and possible physical injury, depending on what the police think you’re capable of), the “system” figures out that the person they were really looking for was also an identity thief, and that you yourself aren’t guilty of anything.

So your arrest record is expunged and you go on with your life, right?

Not in Indiana, apparently.

As it turns out, Indiana has “does not have [a] specific law” regarding the expungement and correction of arrest records for victims of criminal identity theft.

I’m not saying you won’t be able to get your records expunged, but I’ll bet it takes years upon years of sustained effort, red tape and extreme hassle. You’ll basically encounter a wall of, “We don’t have to, so we don’t want to.”

I guess we’re not alone—a lot of states fall under the “no specific law” category at this time.

But you know something? I’ve never been one to buy into the herd mentality, either with regards to action or inaction. In other words, just because not that many other states are doing it doesn’t mean we shouldn’t.

Not many people are running truly non-profit websites about fraud and identity theft prevention, either. Doesn’t stop me, though, does it?

Identity Theft Myths: You don’t have to worry if you have bad credit

I’m going to do a series on identity theft myths over the next couple weeks. I might not end up doing them all in a row, though.

A lot of people think they don’t have to worry about identity theft if their credit is lousy. “Use it all you want,” they think. “You’re not going to get approved for anything anyway, and you can’t make my credit any worse than it is.”

Wrong.

For one thing, even though our current financial situation has made it a little harder to obtain credit, there’s still a possibility that somebody, somewhere will grant the identity thief credit using your information.

However, identity theft isn’t always about obtaining credit and making purchases.

Someone could use your information when they get arrested. When they don’t show up in court, the police could appear on your doorstep, and they’ve heard “you’ve got the wrong guy” a million times, so that won’t help you much. Trying to get a mistaken police record cleared up is a hassle you want to steer clear of.

Someone could also use your information to obtain employment. There is a story I see all the time about a woman who applied for a job at Target, then found out she already worked there, according to their records. Someone was working there using her social security number. I actually haven’t seen a version of this story specific enough to indicate it’s anything more than a made-up anecdote, but the fact is that people steal identities in order to obtain employment. Perhaps it doesn’t hurt you at all, and perhaps you never even find out. However, what if they commit a crime while on the job? It could end up following you.

There’s also medical identity theft.  This is the scariest scenario, because it could cost you your life. When someone uses your identity to obtain medical care, you could end up with insurance companies and hospitals calling to collect payments on services you did not receive. Worse still, incorrect medical records attached to your name, including information such as chronic diseases and allergies, could kill you. What if the fact that you’re severely allergic to a drug gets removed from your record, and you’re brought in unconscious and unable to speak up?

So, even if your credit is less-than-perfect (or just plain awful), don’t assume you’re safe from identity theft. Just because they can’t buy a car using your name and information, doesn’t mean they can’t use it for something (or sell it to someone who can).

Unfortunately for the rest of us, thieves are resourceful that way.