How law enforcement doesn’t operate: scam alert from the BBB

October 18, 2013

If you live in the United States (I can’t vouch for other countries), there are certain ways in which law enforcement is carried out, and ways in which it generally is not.

Here’s one way law enforcement doesn’t work: if there’s a warrant out for your arrest, they usually don’t call you first and tell you.

Here’s another: if you’re accused of a crime, you can’t pay a fine to avoid charges (if you can, it probably means you’re bribing someone, and they’re accepting the bribe, and you’re both in a lot of trouble, mister. Bribing the police. That’s not right!). The fines (and other consequences) generally happen after you’ve been convicted, which is supposed to occur via due process.

The Better Business Bureau is warning of an active scam that has already claimed several victims. The fraudulent phone calls use spoofed caller ID to extort “fines” from victims, by money orders and prepaid debit cards. They’ve got the full lowdown here, but the proper response is one you’ve seen before: don’t give any money or personal information (even if they have some already—victims have reported the callers having information about loans), hang up, call the real police (because others are likely getting the same calls).

The problem is that such phone calls can incite a moment of panic, and panic makes it hard to think rationally. But if you’re aware that such scams exist, you’ll be able to stop, take a breath, calm down and remember how reality works before you become a victim.


Alert for businesses: beware of fake BBB complaint emails

January 18, 2013

I received an email recently that highlights the importance of business owners and employees being aware of various types of fraud activity:

From: Better Business Bureau <[redacted]@newyork.bbb.org>
Subject: Case #28475466
Owner/Manager

The Better Business Bureau has received the above-referenced complaint from one of your customers regarding their dealings with you. The details of the consumer’s concern are included on the reverse. Please review this matter and advise us of your position.

As a neutral third party, the Better Business Bureau can help to resolve the matter. Often complaints are a result of misunderstandings a company wants to know about and correct.

In the interest of time and good customer relations, please provide the BBB with written verification of your position in this matter by January 17, 2013. Your prompt response will allow BBB to be of service to you and your customer in reaching a mutually agreeable resolution. Please inform us if you have contacted your customer directly and already resolved this matter.

The Better Business Bureau develops and maintains Reliability Reports on companies across the United States and Canada . This information is available to the public and is frequently used by potential customers. Your cooperation in responding to this complaint becomes a permanent part of your file with the Better Business Bureau. Failure to promptly give attention to this matter may be reflected in the report we give to consumers about your company.

We encourage you to print this complaint (attached file), answer the questions and respond to us.

We look forward to your prompt attention to this matter.

Sincerely,

BBB Serving Metropolitan New York, Long Island and the Mid-Hudson Region

There was a 102KB file attached to the message named “Complaint Case  #28475466.zip”. Except for the fact that it appeared to come from a Better Business Bureau office a thousand miles away, it looked pretty legitimate.

However, looks can be very deceiving.

According to a report from Cisco, the attachment is an executable file that contains malicious code. They don’t specify what that malware is, but given the nature of the message I would guess it’s designed to log keystrokes or use some other method to steal online banking credentials from businesses. Once they’ve got account numbers and passwords, they wire thousands of dollars out of payroll, expense and other accounts, then use their network of (unwitting and witting) money mules to launder the ill-gotten funds.

So here’s the lesson today: if you receive a message like the one above, do not under any circumstances open the attached file. If you think there might be a legitimate complaint from the Better Business Bureau, contact them directly. It’s a general rule, but in this case it applied more specifically to business owners and their employees.


BBB launches Scam Source website

January 16, 2012

The U.S. Better Business Bureau has launched a new website called Scam Source.

The new site features a channel for consumers to report scams they’ve encountered, a “Scam Aggregator” with links to articles around the web, and email alerts.

I encourage you to poke around the site and sign up for the alerts. It’s still new, so it will be interesting to see what scams they uncover.


Holiday reminder: beware of charity scams

November 30, 2011

The holiday season is a time when many people think about ways to help those in need. However, scam artists have been known to exploit this tendency and set up fraudulent charities to skim money from generous people.

Never give money or personal information to a person who calls, emails or approaches you out of the blue. If you receive a request to donate, research the charity before you respond. www.bbb.org and www.charitynavigator.org are a great place to start.

Beware of charities with names that are similar to well-known organizations, and never make a check out to an individual. Also never make a check out to “CAS,” no matter what “CAS” allegedly stands for; a crook has simply to add an “H” and they’ve got a check from you made out to “CASH.”

Better yet, decide now which charities you’d like to support, and make your donation early. When asked to donate to others, politely explain that you’ve completed your budgeted giving for the year.


Locksmith Scams

August 15, 2011

If it hasn’t already happened to you, it will: you’re going to lock your keys in the car, lock yourself out of the house or find out that a lock rusted shut over the winter.

You’re going to need a locksmith.

It happens to everyone, and yet it’s a need now complicated by con artists; it seems locksmith scams are on the rise.

Typically, victims start by searching online for a locksmith. They call a random listing and get a reasonable-sounding estimate over the phone. When the “locksmith” actually shows up, however, they start adding charges until the price is completely out of line. Since most people in need of a locksmith are in a tight spot, they often end up paying. Sometimes, as a bonus, the phony locksmith will damage your property.

How do you avoid this scam? Choose a locksmith now, before you need one. Either get one you’ve used before and already know to be trustworthy, or check out the Better Business Bureau and online reviews. Make sure you’re dealing with an actual local business instead of having your call routed to a national number, and refuse to use any locksmith that only accepts cash payment.

Once you’ve got your locksmith, save the number in your mobile phone and keep it handy at home.

When you’re away from home, it’s a little trickier to choose one on the fly, but you can still watch out for warning signs like rapidly-escalating costs and cash-only operations.


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