Category Archives: Nigerian 419 Scams

Nigerian 419 email scams live on

I saw this one just today. It’s a doozy:

From: The Desk Of Mr. James Dike
Reference: GTBank Plc.
Address: 402, Lagos-Abeokuta Expressway, Abule-Egba, Lagos State, Nigeria.

Attention: $10.5M ATM Fund Beneficiary,

I am Mr. James Dike, the new appointed ATM Head of Operation Department Guaranty Trust Bank Nigeria PLC, I resumed to this office on the 1st of this month and For your information i have been empowered and instructed by the new elected President Federal Republic of Nigeria Gen. Muhammadu Buhari to pay all outstanding debt payment to the rightful beneficiaries and summit my payment report to his office with immediate effect and any payment that is not paid before the end of this month will be cancelled and the fund will be returned to the Federal Reserve Oil Account.

So, during my official research last week I discovered an abandoned ATM Master card valued sum of $10.5Million with card number 5321452123409380 belonging to you as the rightfully intimate beneficiary. I tried to know why this card have not been released to you but I was told that the formal ATM head of operation who left this office two months ago withhold your card for his own personal use without knowing that I will not approve or support him to take your card.

Now that your ATM Master card is still available for you to pick it up here in our bank. I want to know how you wish to receive your ATM card along with your four digits pin code number. You can come down here in our bank to pick up your card direct from my office or alternatively it can be send to your address through any registered reliable courier service company that you will take care of the courier charge. I don’t know the cost of shipping the card to you but if you permit me I can make an inquiry from the courier shipment company to find out the cost, but in that case you will be required to forward to me your shipment address to enable me find out the shipment cost to your location.

Your direct telephone number and address will be needed and more details of your ATM Master card payment will be made known to you as soon as I receive your swift positive response, to enable you know the amount programmed for your ATM Master Card daily withdrawal.I will send your ATM master card information including your Card Pin Code as soon as you declare your choice of receiving your ATM card so as to enable you receive your card and start making use of it to withdraw at any ATM card machine all over the world as programmed.

Do not hesitate to call me on +234 802-850-0459 as soon as you read this mail.

Thanks for your co-operation.

Yours Faithfully,
Mr. James Dike
ATM Head of Operation Department
Guaranty Trust Bank Nigeria Plc.
Tel: +234 802-850-0459.

A lot of us have become jaded when it comes to the old Nigerian 419 scam. Even though this one takes a different angle and doesn’t mention an exiled prince, for many of us, it’s easy to see through. We probably wouldn’t even read it…”$10.5M” in the subject line would be enough to trigger our “delete” reflex.

But somebody still falls for it. If they didn’t, these emails wouldn’t happen anymore. So while you may have become almost flippant about the Nigerian 419 scam, remember that there are still people who haven’t heard about it yet. If someone you know starts talking about an impending payout from a mysterious source, or mentions their plans to wire money overseas, it might be time to educate him or her.

Retired couple gives away $11 million lottery win, but not to you

This message was waiting in my inbox this morning. It may actually be one of the best examples of social engineering I’ve yet come across:

Dear sir/madam
 
This is a personal email directed to you. I and my wife won a Jackpot Lottery of $11.3 million in July and have voluntarily decided to donate the sum of $500,000.00 USD to you as part of our own charity project to improve the lot of 10 lucky individuals all over the world. If you have received this email then you are one of the lucky recipients and all you have to do is get back with us so that we can send your details to the payout bank. Please you have to help me in prayer for my wife, You can verify this by visiting the web pages below.*(allen.violet.large01@filipinos.ca)*
 
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40009180/ns/us_news-giving/t/retired-couple-gives-away-million-lottery-win/
 
Note: YOU HAVE TO CONTACT MY PRIVATE EMAIL *( allen.violet.large01@filipinos.ca )* FOR MORE INFO
 
Goodluck,
Allen and Violet Large
Email: allen.violet.large01@filipinos.ca

Here’s what was so brilliant about it: you know how these scam email messages always contain disguised links (e.g., the link says “chase.com” but really takes you to some spyware-infested website with a .ru domain)?

The website shown in the message wasn’t disguised at all. Furthermore, it really takes you to an MSNBC article. Further furthermore, there really was an elderly couple from Nova Scotia named Allen and Violet Large, who really won $11 million playing the lottery, and who really did give it all away. I didn’t remove the link from the message quoted above—it’s safe to go ahead and click on it (it’s actually kind of a neat story).

So how do I know it’s not real, and is in fact just another Nigerian 419-style scam?

First off, it arrived via email. To me, it’s already suspicious. Secondly, it’s an email that’s telling me I’m going to get a large amount of cash for doing nothing. At this point, I’m already one thousand percent sure it’s fraudulent.

But let’s really make a case against it, shall we? Read the first paragraph of the MSNBC article (emphasis mine):

An elderly couple who won around $11 million from a lottery ticket in Canada have given the money away to good causes and family, according to media reports.

Have given. Not “are giving.” It’s a done deal, dude; if you’re not a good cause or related to the Larges, and if you haven’t already received money from them, you’re not getting any ’cause there ain’t no more.

Finally, the senders made a rookie mistake: the “from” line didn’t say Allen Large or Violet Large, nor did it contain the “filipinos.ca” email address; instead the message appeared to come from a completely different name with a scasd.us email address (it’s that of a real person, so I won’t give any more details than that).

I don’t know where this scam is coming from, so I can’t say if it’s just a plain old Nigerian 419-style scam or a Nigerian Nigerian 419 scam, but I noticed the signature at the end uses the word “Goodluck” instead of “good luck,” and it only stood out to me because I know that the President of Nigeria is actually named Goodluck Jonathan.

Then again, that could just be a typo; since we already know it’s a scam, we’re really just sort of nitpicking at this point.

Nigerian 419 Scam: “Your Bank Draft”

Often, phishing emails are tricky because they contain an offer that many people would find tempting. This one I received over the weekend does not have that problem:

From: Dr Lawrence Burns <test@mir-grp.com>
To: ss@yahoo.com
Subject: YOUR BANK DRAFT

Dear Friend,

It is my pleasure to let you know about my success in getting those fund transferred under the cooperation of a new Partner from Greece. I didn’t forget your past efforts to assist me in transferring those funds.

Now contact my secretary Mr. Goodluck Okeke his email is (good_okeke@w.cn) ask him to send you the total $3.2 certified bank draft which I raised for your compensation so feel free and get in touched with him and give him your Address such as Full name Home address direct phone number where to send the draft.

Let me know immediately you receive it for us to share the joy. I am very busy here with investment projects which I am having at hand, finally, I left instruction to the secretary on your behalf, so feel free to get in touch with him.

Best regards,
Dr Lawrence Burns

$3.2? As in three dollars and twenty cents?

I don’t want to come off as some kinda spoiled, complacent jerkface here, Doctor Larry, but that seems like an awful lot of work for $3.20.

Obviously, they left out the word “million” and I’m just being snarky here, but there are some interesting things. We’ve got the usual email-address-salad going on here, with the mysterious “mir-grp.com” domain, the China-based “w.cn,” and someone at yahoo.com. We’ve also got a mention of someone named “Goodluck,” which is apparently a popular first name in (wait for it…) Nigeria.

In other words, all the evidence of a Nigerian 419 scam is present and accounted for.

What is a Nigerian 419 scam?

In the world of fraud prevention, you’ll see the term “Nigerian 419 Scam” come up quite a lot. But what is it?

Simply put, a Nigerian 419 scam (or just “Nigerian scam”) is a type of advance fee fraud; the victim sends or wires money to the scammer in hopes of receiving a large payout. Naturally, this payout never comes.

In the early days of the scheme (1980s), crooks used postal mail and fax to try and hook people, but email is the preferred medium today—you can send millions of messages at the same time, for free.

Here’s the hook: the con artist claims to be a relative of a deposed dictator, an African prince living in exile, a government employee, banker, or similar. In every case, they claim to know of a large sum of money, either their own or someone else’s, but need your assistance in obtaining it. In return for your help, they will give you a percentage of the fortune, usually to the tune of several million dollars.

The victim will be asked to help by sending money, either to bribe a bank official or to set up a bank account (they are given the impression that they must keep a certain amount of money in a Nigerian bank in order to get a piece of the fortune). Once the victim starts sending money, the con artists will claim to experience various delays and the need for more cash, in hopes of further stealing from the victim.

At some point, the victim either realizes they’ve been had, or the crooks move on to new victims. There have been cases of victims being kidnapped, robbed and murdered, as well.

It sounds so obvious when you deconstruct it, but the simple fact is that an awful lot of people still fall for this scheme. Crooks don’t keep hammering away at scams that don’t work.

There are a thousand different signs to watch out for, like messages sent from free web-based email addresses or persons asking you to wire money via Western Union or Moneygram, but I think we can narrow it down to just this one point: never send money in an attempt to get money (or gold, diamonds, or anything else).

For one thing, how many Nigerian princes do you think there are in the world? How did this prince, banker, government official or whatever, just happen to pick you, out of over six billion other people on Earth? How do you know you’re dealing with a real person at all?

More to the point, why in the world would you even attempt to get your hands on a pile of stolen or embezzled cash? Think about that—stealing is stealing, no matter what country it originated in. Even if it all turned out to be true, how do you think you’re going to explain $2,500,000 to the IRS? They’re going to ask. You know they will.

Of course, that won’t happen, because it never turns out to be true. Stop asking yourself, “But what if it is?” right now. It’s not. In the history of the entire universe, there has never been a single case of this deal being legitimate.

By the way, why is it called a “Nigerian 419 scam” in the first place?

Well, these things originated in Nigeria in the 1980s, when their economy was circling the drain in a major way (they’ve never really recovered). Many of these scams still come from Nigeria, and there may be actual Nigerian government officials involved in some of these schemes, which can be run by single people acting alone, or by powerful organized crime syndicates. “419” is an article of the Nigerian Criminal Code that deals with fraud.

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